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Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine

Speech and Hearing Sciences

What do speech-language pathologists do?

The profession of speech-language pathologist is ranked tenth on its list of the best jobs of 2014 by CareerCast.com.

U.S. News & World Report, 2012: Speech-Language Pathologist: #14 of Top 25 Jobs in 2012, predicting about 28,000 new therapist positions in the workplace by 2020.

Speech-Language Pathologist: Job Profile & Salary »

Speech-Language Pathologists topped CNN Money’s list as the #1 Best job for Working Parents. The occupation of speech-language pathologist is rated as a fulfilling, high-paying profession, offering flexible schedules to accommodate working parents and rated #29 out of 100 best jobs for 2012! (CNN Money, October 2011)

Best jobs in America: 29. Speech-Language Pathologist »

What do speech language pathologists do?

  • Training with alternative/augmentative communication devices for those with limited ability to verbally communicate
  • Aural rehabilitation for individuals who are hearing impaired
  • Treatment for articulation errors
  • Provide therapy to individuals with delayed language development
  • Early intervention among preschoolers
  • Work with children to improve language skills and academic performance
  • Treat people who have experienced a stroke or brain trauma to regain language and speech functions
  • Assist individuals who are experiencing swallowing difficulties
  • Assist individuals in developing proper control of the vocal and respiratory systems for correct voice production
  • Counsel individuals and families to better cope with speech and language disorders
  • Help those who stutter to increase fluency
  • Participate in clinical (applied) and/or basic research related to speech-language disorders and their effects
  • Teach and supervise future speech-language pathologists

EXAMPLES OF WHERE AUDIOLOGISTS AND SPEECH PATHOLOGISTS WORK

  • Hospitals and rehabilitation centers.
  • Nursing care facilities and community clinics.
  • Colleges and universities.
  • Private practice offices.
  • State and local health departments.
  • State and federal government agencies.
  • Home health agencies (home care).
  • Long-term facilities.
  • Adult day care centers.
  • Research laboratories and institutes.
  • Private industry.
  • Nonprofit clinics.
  • Public and private schools.

OUR SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGISTS IN THE NEWS

Geogrina Lynch Joins Expert Panel Discussion on PBS Health Matters: “Understanding Autism” (December 2012)

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Contact Us

Anna Brown
Undergraduate Academic Coordinator
509-358-7709
speechhearing@wsu.edu

Jason Trosine
Graduate Academic Coordinator
509-358-7602
speech.hear.grad@wsu.edu

Linda Gallup
Program Administration and Operations
509-368-6824
linda.gallup@wsu.edu

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